Welcome to BirdsCaribbean!

BirdsCaribbean, formerly the Society for the Conservation and Study of Caribbean Birds, is the largest regional organization dedicated to the conservation of wild birds and their habitats in the insular Caribbean (including Bermuda, the Bahamas and all islands within the Caribbean basin).

Founded in 1988, it is a non-profit (501 (c) 3) membership organization with over 1,200 members and supporters from around the world and throughout the islands. BirdsCaribbean serves as the Caribbean’s primary forum to promote on-the-ground conservation action by increasing human capacity, raising awareness, and promoting sound science. We also emphasize the  sharing of best practices, tools, innovations and lessons learned. By working together with our members and affiliated groups we influence decision-making and conservation policy.

In the News

This is an excellent opportunity to gain multi-species shorebird ID and monitoring experience.

Join the Conservian Live-Aboard Schooner Expedition 2017

Your help is needed to protect beach-nesting birds, nests, and young. Conservian is planning for Year 2 of their shorebird and habitat conservation program in the Bahamas. Come join them for ...

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BirdsCaribbean President Andrew Dobson

2017 President's Address

Dear Members and Friends of BirdsCaribbean, What a start to the year! I am excited and honored to be serving you as President of BirdsCaribbean as 2017 gets under ...

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Free Ebook Shares Stories of Caribbean Waterbirds

Free Ebook Shares Stories of Caribbean Waterbirds

From our coastlines and mangroves, to ponds, lakes and rivers, waterbirds are an ever-present part of Caribbean landscapes. They include our majestic seabirds, gregarious ducks, elegant egrets and ...

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White-crowned Pigeon-feeding on the ground on fallen berries after Hurricane Matthew in Grand Bahama. (photo by Erika Gates)

Hurricanes and Birds Part 2: How Do Caribbean Birds Survive?

Can Caribbean bird populations survive hurricanes? Or perhaps we should ask, how do they manage to live through the storms’ fierce onslaught as well as survive the aftermath ...

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An American Redstart that fell victim to Hurricane Matthew. (photo by Linda Barry Cooper)

Hurricanes and Birds Part 1: Mean Hurricane Matthew

Well, the Atlantic hurricane season is finally over, and island dwellers in the Caribbean can breathe a sigh of relief. The 2016 season that ended on November 30 ...

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Bahama Oriole adult on Andros. It could be a male or a female, as both sexes have this striking black and yellow coloration.  (photo Daniel Stonko, UMBC)

Opportunity to Study One of the Rarest Birds in the Caribbean – The Bahama Oriole Project

The Bahama Oriole (Icterus northropi) is the most endangered bird in the Bahamas. It is now restricted just to the Andros Island complex. There may be as few ...

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